FREE DELIVERY ON ALL ORDERS OVER $100

0

Your Cart is Empty

February 24, 2021 1 min read

The Decadent History of Chocolate in France  

French desserts are often synonymous with chocolate. In fact, when you think of luxuriousness and sheer decadence of French desserts, chocolate feels like a fitting companion. But, when did this fascination with this cocoa treat first begin? 
Well, it turns out that chocolate has a long and rich history in France:  
A Royal Welcome to France  
Believe it or not, chocolate wasn’t actually “invented” in France. Rather, it was brought over by the Spaniards. In particular, this cocoa elixir was introduced to the nation via Anne of Austria, the daughter of Philip III of Spain. When she married Louis XIII of France, she brought her chocolate along with her.  She wasn’t the only Spaniard to share chocolate treats with France, however. Another Spanish princess, Marie Thérèse, was married to Louis XIV, further championing the use of chocolate in the French court. However, chocolate wasn’t actually consumed in the way that it is today… 
Liquid Chocolate Gold  
People had some rather interesting ideas  about chocolate in the beginning. To begin with, it wasn’t actually treated as a dessert or a treat. Instead, it was considered to be a recreational drug. This is because it was believed to have a calming effect. Many people reached for it as an aphrodisiac as well.  When chocolate was first introduced to France, though, it was consumed in liquid form. The chocolate was frothed into water or milk-the precursor of modern day hot chocolate. Some cooks would add spices or vanilla for more complex flavours.  Another thing of note was the fact that chocolate was strictly for nobility. It wasn’t until the 19th century that the chocolate was made available to masses. By then, chocolate production had become easier and other companies were able to supply it to the general population.  
Still, most considered chocolate to be medicinal. Therefore, you would typically find chocolate in pharmacies instead of shops or cafes! As it grew in popularity, though, it quickly progressed to an ingredient in desserts.  
Chocolate in French Desserts  
The popularity of chocolate meant that cooks found a variety of ways to infuse this luxurious ingredient with other components. Thus, classic desserts such as éclairs, poire belle Hélène, chocolate mousse, orangettes, profiteroles, souffles, macarons, pain au chocolatand more! In fact, it is estimated that the average French citizen consumes around 8 kilograms of chocolate each year in some form or another! And, it appears that this number has been rising over the years. Needless to say, chocolate has a very important place and function in French cuisine.  
French Chocolate in the Modern Age  
Chocolate continues to be a mainstay in French desserts. These days, though, standalone chocolate bars have become more luxurious than ever before. In fact, the Bayonne region is considered to be the chocolate capital of the country due to the sheer number of chocolate creators and houses in the area.  
Chocolate bars don’t just consist of cocoa and sugar anymore, either. Rather, you will find the finest chocolates infused with the most fragrant of teas. This includes bold and robust black tea, bergamote, infused Earl Grey tea, and even the gently scented Jasmine tea. This helps to elevate the French chocolate from just a treat that you simply nibble on. Instead, such chocolates are meant to be savoured and considered a delicacy.  
Still, old habits die hard. No matter where you go in France, you will still find café owners that will froth bars of chocolate and milk for you to enjoy thick cups of hot chocolate. And, some of the top pastries continue to be éclairschocolat au pain, and chocolate mousse! It is clear that chocolate plays a significant role not just in French cuisine but in the culture as well. 
Although chocolate may have not originated in France, it has certainly managed to take hold in the country and its people. Needless to say, it doesn’t appear that things will be changing any time soon.  

Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.

Subscribe